What we choose not to say

1 04 2012

The newspapers are full of coverage of the recent by-election in Bradford west, or as George Galloway refers to it – Blackburn. The other story sharing the headlines is the recent fuel shortage fiasco and Diane Hill that managed to suffer 40% burns after unwisely decanting petrol in her Kitchen next to a lit stove . In both cases the media is avoiding telling us the obvious and probably for the same politically correct reasons.

Number one, Gorgeous George’s victory comes in an area heavily populated by Muslim voters. His pro-Arab anti-western and often anti-Semitic views echo their own, except they like him more because it adds legitimacy to their insular and hatred infused views when they are perpetuated by a white catholic. This isn’t labour’s failure nor the conservatives, this is a sign of things to come and Galloway is just a sensationalist puppet for those that would gladly form the fifth column when called for.

Diane Hill is an idiot, the likes of which we have not seen in sometime. Common sense and logic dictates that there are far safer place to decant petrol than next to a lit stove. But the papers are championing her as a victim of minister Francis Maude’s gerry can gaffe. Calls for his resignation are sensationalist and represent the paper’s braying call for blood because it will sell more papers. What no one has failed to state explicitly is that regardless of how ill advised Maude’s comments were, this woman is incredibly stupid and the only person responsible for her actions is the woman herself.

When the press in this country grow a moral backbone and start calling things for what they are, the closer we will come to having open conversation about the things we fear the most.





The world’s gone flotilla mad.

27 06 2010

Flotilla is one of those words that doesnt really get out much, but when it does, oh boy does it have a lot of making up for lost time to do.

Surely, the flotilla, or at least the idea of a flotilla as some sort of expression of protest is now so over done that we have all lost interest?

First there was the ill fated Turkish Flotilla, with its quest to batter the living shit out of a few Israeli commandos. That didnt go too well.

Then there was the Irish attempt, which was an anti-climax in which no one really got hurt or killed, although I did hear of more than one case of Israeli caused, sea-sickness. Those bastards, have they no decency?

Now we have the Flotilla of the daughters of Mary, Flotilla against peace, Flotilla for Peace, a US Flotilla (only once around the statue of liberty, alas) in aid of kidnapped Israeli Soldier Gilad Shalit.

I for one am amazed at this maritime madness. I can only assume that ALL of the aforementioned Flotillas are organised by people with absolutely nothing better to do.

Jaysus, get up, go to work, pay the mortgage and feed the wife and kids; or get on a boat and pick a fight with one of the world’s most aggressive military outfits? Mmmm, no brainer really.

Personally, I just have to so much look at a boat and I get sea sick and the word Flotilla instantly casts images of unflushable faecal matter which is precisely what these ill advised so called humanitarian efforts amount to.

What next? Bono, Chris Martin and Sir Bob Geldoff getting together to arrange Flotilla Aid? A concert put together by do-gooder idiots to raise much needed funds for the world’s most violent terrorists?

Its all a matter of taste. Bad taste.





Hung, drawn and quartered

10 05 2010

Hung Parliament

The recent political situation has left most of the UK wondering what happens next. This isn’t as some are painting it, a classic exercise in UK voter apathy. On the contrary, the public have spoken and it is as many predicted, to0 close a race to call.

There is one thing that is certain since Gordon Brown sacrificed himself in front of the nation this evening, to allow some sort of coalition hope to be fostered between the Lib Dems and the Labour Party- its less about the party and its more about the man.

On balance, I think that Gordon Brown has taken a lot of unnecessary flack in the aftermath of the “global” economic crisis. The English have run out of heroes and instead we prefer our effigies.

Whilst he might not be the most charismatic of men he is certainly about the only one of the bunch with the political pedigree and experience. But like many have said, we don’t need two chancellors, we need one clear leader. In the aftermath of what is being hailed as a “farce” of a general election, Britain is far from being led by one clear leader.

The electoral reform proposed by the Liberal Democrats seeks to put an end to the two party system and by and large the majority of the public would probably be in favour of this, if they actually understood it in the first place. The tories have been too slow in coming forward with their willingness to accept this and hastily seemed to have issued some form of “referendum based” compromise on the matter in light of increased chance of a Labourt -Lib Dem coalition.

This might not be the most straightforward situation that Britain has found itself in,  but it certainly is the most interesting General Election outcome for some time. In many ways, the stale mate between the parties has promoted further interest in the archaic voting system and revived political interest amongst sections of the public that considered the results of elections a foregone conclusion.

As David Cameron wakes up to the realisation that despite his majority win, he might yet wake up to being the leader of the opposition against a Lib Dem – Labour Coalition Government, the real winner is the British public who’s message has been clearly heard by all three parties: There is such little difference between the soundbite lead policies of the big three.